Teenagers diagnosed with psychiatric disorders need resources to overcome the obstacles they face in the school system and the job market. As it stands today many teenagers with these conditions grow up to have long periods of unemployment and social exclusion. 

Researchers say Resources Needed to Prevent Social Exclusion

Teenagers diagnosed with psychiatric disorders need resources to overcome the obstacles they face in the school system and the job market. As it stands today many teenagers with these conditions grow up to have long periods of unemployment and social exclusion. 

These difficulties were highlighted in a study from the British Journal of Psychiatry. Researchers say the study shows the need for governments to invest more money in helping identify and help younger folks struggling with mental disorders. 

“To help prevent the social exclusion of adolescents, their treatment and rehabilitation require more resources than are currently being used as well as development of evidence-based treatment and rehabilitation,” researcher Ida Ringbom explained.

While this study was conducted on subjects from Finland, it highlights why it is important to ensure students here at home have the resources they need to live fulfilling lives.

In the U.S. autistic students are three times as likely to be suspended or expelled by an institution of learning.

Additionally parents of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder are often dissatisfied with resources available for their children, and many teachers lack the training to educate students with special needs.

Among the folks diagnosed with psychiatric conditions, 11% had reported a period of at least five years where they were “not in education, employment or training.” 

Only 3% of individuals diagnosed with a psychiatric condition in their youth went through a similar five year period. 

This data seems to imply students diagnosed with these conditions are at risk of falling behind once they leave the school system.

The researchers highlight the importance of employment in young people. They point out how long periods of unemployment can lead to a sense of social marginalization. 

“Apart from providing financial independence, having a job can provide an individual with structure and purpose to their life and a social role without stigma,” the researchers argued.

The study examined 55,273 Finnish children born in 1987 and looked at whether they received a psychiatric diagnosis along with if they went a long period with no education, employment or training.

Students who had not completed their upper secondary education but who had been diagnosed with a psychiatric condition were particularly at risk of becoming socially marginalized. 

Upper secondary education in Finland takes place when students are 15 or 16 and is similar to the last two years of U.S. highschool and the first two years of college. 

There are many obstacles people who experience symptoms of psychosis and autism spectrum disorder run into in our modern educational system and job market. 

The researchers made some recommendations for how to solve some of the problems these students face all over the world. 

“Vocational rehabilitation and tight collaboration between psychiatry and social services,” argues the leader of the study, Assistant Professor David Gyllenberg, “are important for enabling adolescents suffering from mental health problems to access the labour market.”

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