Man infects himself with mushrooms and they astart growing in his veins

Man Studied After Accidentally Growing Shrooms in His Veins

A 30-year-old man recently injected himself with shrooms — and nearly died when they began growing in his veins. 

The man had long suffered from opioid addiction and bipolar disorder. After researching the therapeutic effects of psilocybin, he stopped taking his meds and decided to try magic mushrooms instead. 

The patient boiled the mushrooms into a tea and injected the brew into his bloodstream. Soon, he began suffering from a host of symptoms, including diarrhea, fatigue, and jaundice. He even began vomiting blood.

When he started exhibiting signs of confusion, his family rushed him to a Nebraska emergency room. By the time the doctors got to him, he couldn’t give them coherent answers to their questions, and his organs had begun shutting down. 

The Nebraska patient’s doctors say his case demonstrates a need for more public education on psilocybin

Dylan Croll

Upon drawing a blood sample, the doctors made an alarming discovery: mushrooms had begun growing in the man’s bloodstream — the same kind he had previously ingested. 

The doctors immediately sprang into action. They put the patient on a ventilator and gave him two antibiotics and one antifungal treatment. After eight days in the ICU and 22 total days in the hospital, he eventually recovered (though he will remain on medication in the long-term.)

The doctors, who redacted the patient’s name, recently detailed his misfortune in the Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry

Magic mushrooms — which contain psilocybin, a chemical compound that induces psychedelic hallucinations and therapeutic healing for some — have shown promise as a treatment for people suffering from addiction and mental illness. Consequently, Oregon recently became the first state to legalize shrooms for therapeutic purposes, and several U.S. cities, including Ann Arbor and Washington DC, have decriminalized them. 

Even so, patients in such places will only be taking shrooms under the supervision of trained professionals. The Nebraska patient’s doctors say his case demonstrates a need for more public education on psilocybin. 

“The case reported above underscores,” the doctors stated, according to Gizmodo, “the need for ongoing public education regarding the dangers attendant to the use of this, and other drugs, in ways other than they are prescribed.”

Dylan Croll is a freelance writer based in California. In the past, he’s worked at the Laslo Congressional Bureau, as a CollegeFix Fellow at The Weekly Standard, Norwood News, and in public relations. He can be found on Twitter at @CrollonPatrol

Dylan Croll is a freelance writer based in California. In the past, he’s worked at the Laslo Congressional Bureau, as a CollegeFix Fellow at The Weekly Standard, Norwood News, and in public relations. He can be found on Twitter at @CrollonPatrol

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