Connecticut is opening studies up for psilocybin

Conn. Gov. Latest to Approve Study of Psilocybin, or Shrooms

This week Connecticut became the latest to approve a study into the therapeutic potential of psilocybin, aka magic mushrooms — a once universally outlawed psychedelic that’s becoming en vogue from coast to coast.

Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont signed off on the new psychedelic policy proposal as part of a broader package of health reform initiatives.

The provision stipulates the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services must convene a working group, which needs to include legislators familiar with public health issues, to “study the health benefits of psilocybin.” 

“Such study shall include, but need not be limited to, an examination of whether the use of psilocybin by a person under the direction of a health care provider may be beneficial to the person’s physical or mental wellbeing,” the text of the measure states.

Eight cities — Denver, Oakland and Santa Cruz, Calif., Ann Arbor, Mich., Washington, D.C., Somerville and Cambridge and Northampton, Mass. — have now decriminalized possession of a broader collection of plant-and fungi-based psychedelics.

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The working group would need to issue a report to the legislature on its findings and recommendations by January 1, 2022. 

The psilocybin proposal was also introduced in a separate bill containing various measures related to mental and behavioral health. But the language was later incorporated into SB 1083. An even narrower, one-line bill filed in January also called for the establishment of a psilocybin task force.

Lamont did not comment on the specifics of the psychedelics provision.

Connecticut’s not alone. Numerous state legislatures have been considering different reform proposals for psychedelics this session. In Texas, legislators recently sent a bill requiring the state to study the therapeutic potential of psychedelics to Republican Gov. Greg Abbott’s desk.

Last week, the California Senate approved a bill to legalize the possession of psychedelics, including LSD, DMT and ibogaine. Oregon voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure last year to create a first-of-its-kind program where people can be treated with psilocybin in a clinical setting.

Eight cities — Denver, Oakland and Santa Cruz, Calif., Ann Arbor, Mich.,  Washington, D.C., Somerville and Cambridge and Northampton, Mass.  — have now decriminalized possession of a broader collection of plant-and fungi-based psychedelics.

This piece is a part of a content sharing arrangement between The News Station and Marijuana Moment.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE, etc.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE, etc.

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